Current Lab Members

Principal Investigator

Dr. Joe Henrich
Professor of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University
 
 
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Post-Docs

Dr. Martin Lang

Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

My work lies at the intersection between the humanities and the cognitive and behavioral sciences, combining laboratory experiments with field studies to explore the effects of ritual on the individual and group level. I study effects of music on inter-personal coordination, synchronous movement, decision-making and social bonding. My other research line is focused on understanding the role that ritualized motor sequences might play in alleviating anxiety. I use physiological measurements, motion capture, machine-learning algorithms, and linear and nonlinear data analysis (recurrence quantification analysis). (website)

Dr. Anke Becker

Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

My research interests lie at the intersection of economics, psychology and anthropology. In particular, I am interested in whether and how culture shapes our preferences and beliefs. (website

 

SchulzDr. Jonathan Schulz

Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

My research focuses on the co-evolution of culture and formal institutions. I am particularly interested in the role of kin-network structures on moral behavior and the formation of nation states with well-functioning institutions. My research combines insights from anthropology, economics and psychology making use of econometric methods and tools from experimental economics. (website).

 

Graduate Students

Manvir Singh

G6 in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

I’m intrigued by the processes by which rules emerge in human societies, as well as the evolutionary underpinnings and cultural evolution of expressive behavior (art). I earned an ScB from Brown University in 2012 (and studied burying beetles) before pursuing a year-long Fulbright project about policing in animal societies. I currently conduct fieldwork among the Mentawai people of Siberut Island (Indonesia). (website)

 

Graham Noblit
G3 in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

I aim to understand variation in political-economic outcomes between populations by examining political preferences and their origins. I do this using behavioral experiments in an ethnographic context and draw on psychological and cognitive methods in order to illuminate the mental and affective processes that generate behavior. This approach allows me to explicitly link variation in institutions with that of behavior, and may further our understanding of the nature and structure of the human mind. In a sense, I am trying to bring institutions to the study of psychology and psychology to the study of institutions. I intend to apply my findings by designing institutions that solve community- and state-level problems without ignoring individual-level psychology and behavior.  Email: graham_noblit[~at~]g.harvard.edu.


Kevin Hong
G3 in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

I am broadly interested in understanding human behavior from evolutionary perspectives. In particular, I study the evolution of non-adaptive behaviors in light of dual inheritance theory and gene-culture co-evolution. In addition, I am interested in the future of human evolution given the contemporary cultural environment in post-industrial countries.

 
Tommy Flint

G2 in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

Right now I'm interested in research related to alcohol use, violence, mating systems and strategies, the psychology of social norms and reputations, literacy, and storytelling. If you'd like to talk about any of those topics send me an email: tommyflint[~at~]g.harvard.edu. 

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Lab Associates

Max WinklerMax Winkler
Visting PhD student from the Department of Economics, University of Zurich
 
My research aims to shed light on the foundations of individual and collective decision making by integrating insights from psychology and anthropology into economics. I have digitized historical sources and compiled novel data sets using text analysis and lab-in-the-field experiments to study the origins and consequences of cultural variation in preferences, beliefs, and values.
 
 

Lab Manager

CammieCammie Curtin

Culture, Cognition, & Coevolution Lab Manager

I received a B.A. in Neuroscience from Middlebury College in 2013, where I also explored my interest in culture through coursework in language, art history, and anthropology.  Hopes of synthesizing these areas brought me to the Culture, Cognition and Coevolution Lab. My research interests include cultural evolution, the evolution of language, and the relationship between language and cognition.